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Words from Tulu

Words from Tulu

These are the words and musings of Chris and Sara as they pursue their dream of sailing away on their catamaran called TULU

Karimunjawa and Central Java

Sailing Posted on Fri, October 23, 2015 02:35:35

On the two night passage from Bali to the island of Karimunjawa, off the coast of Java, we were certainly kept on our toes and had to keep a particularly vigilant watch all the time as we dodged fishing boats, fish attractors, tugs towing massive unlit barges, oil and gas platforms and of course cargo ships and tankers – mind you – at least the big ships are on AIS and are predictable! Saying that, we had a great sail and even caught a nice mahi mahi, our first in Indonesia.

Karimunjawa is a sleepy little town and island with good snorkelling and a generally relaxed atmosphere. We had our usual welcome rally festivities with the organisers inviting us to be dressed in traditional Javanese costumes for the evening. The ladies amongst us had visions of wearing the beautifully colourful slinky bejwelled outfits that we have seen so often as we watch the local dancing, but alas we were wrong – we were dressed in the most drab shapeless sacks you could imagine, but of course had to make all the appropriate noises about how lovely they were. Anyway it was a bit of a giggle and apart from sweating buckets as these outfits were over the clothes we were wearing, we had a good evening.

The next morning Lynne from Sunchaser and Sara joined a small group to take the ferry across to Java and travel inland to visit some of the iconic temples of Java. We left Chris and Peter on the boats as the thought of them travelling for hours just to visit a few temples was not worth considering – not Chris’ cup of tea. Sara and Lynne had a good time despite the four hour ferry ride followed by a seven hour journey in a minibus into central Java – not helped by horrendous traffic jams and a flat tyre! They say Java is one of the most highly populated islands in the world – and I can believe it – also with probably more motorbikes than most places. Even in the countryside the roads were really busy.

Having been travelling all day we arrived in Prambanan to watch the Ramayama ballet at the Trimurti open-air stage with a backdrop of Prambanan hindu temple illuminated behind – a stunning setting, beautiful costumes and mesmerizing dancing and the trials of a long journey were forgotten. The story of Ramayama is the Indonesian version of Romeo and Juliet – Rama and Shinta being the lovers. Although we missed the beginning this turned out to be the highlight of the trip.

After a night in Yogyakarta we visited the Sultans Palace then returned to visit the 10th century Hindu complex of Prambanan. This is the largest Hindu temple complex in Indonesia and is characterised by the intricate tall pointed architecture of its principal temples dedicated to Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma and hundreds of surrounding shrines and reliefs depicting the story of Ramayans. In 2006 a strong earthquake destroyed much of the temple complex and since then they have been meticulously restored – an on going process at this World Heritage site.

In the afternoon we visited another Unesco World Heritage Site – the impressive Buddhist temple of Borobudur – another breathtaking visit. This temple was built in about 800AD in the form of a stepped pyramid and and sitting on each level are 72 stupas, each containing a Buddha figure. A series of five square bases is succeeded by three circular terraces representing the spiritual journey from the life of desire, through meditation to Nirvana. Built of blocks of lava rock it has nearly 1500 carved story panels and 504 statues of Buddha. Having been abandoned around the 14th century Borobudur was buried under layers of volcanic ash and tropical foliage until re-discovered by Sir Stamford Raffles, the British Governor General of Java in 1814.

From Borobudur we drove back to Jepara to spend the night in a hotel before going to the market then taking the ferry (a fast one this time) back to Karimunjawa – phew – a whilstle stop tour of some wonderful sites in central Java, but well worth the effort.

Back on Tulu, we invited a few friends over for sundowners to help celebrate Sara’s birthday. As we planned to leave at first light the following morning we decided to keep the birthday party low key – we should have known better – music and dancing on the aft deck with copious amounts of alcohol – oh well – we had a great night!

To everyones surprise we did manage to leave at first light the next morning for the passage up to west Kalimantan on the southwest of Borneo…..



Gili Air and Bali

Sailing Posted on Thu, October 08, 2015 03:39:19

Instead of stopping in Medana Bay on Lombok where the planned rally stop was, we decided to duck out of the official dinner this time and head to the island of Gili Air, just off the north west of Lombok. Along with neighbouring Gili Meno and Gili Trawandan these islands are a well known holiday destination among backpackers – we increased the average age considerably. The anchorage was very peaceful at night, but in the day we had constant washes from ferry and snorkel boats coming in and out. We originally picked up a mooring ball only to find that we dragged on it so we changed to a larger one which had a much bigger lump of concrete on its base. Together with a number of other rally boats we had a great few days of partying. The first night was Brooke’s birthday (Psycho Puss) and two days later was Lynne’s (Sunchaser) – each time we celebrated with cocktails on the beach followed by dinner – how civilised – so we didn’t get out of training we did the same the evening in between as well!

Gili Air was a lovely, very flat island, nice beaches and no cars – only pony and trap as transport. A pure holiday island with lots of single story hostels, cabins, shops, restaurants and bars. We were able to walk around the island and across the middle – past the one mosque for the locals. Everything comes on and off the island by boat and, with no vehicles, is unloaded by hand. We saw building stones being carried up the beach one at a time and the foundations for new buildings being dug by hand.

We slipped from the mooring ball in Gili Air (intentionally this time) at 2.00am for the sail along the north coast of Bali to arrive in Lovina beach before dusk the next day. During the night we had a full moon and by the time we were off the coast of Bali we had daylight which was just as well as there were numerous fishing boats out at first light and the coastal waters were littered with fish attractors – some of which were barely visible until very close – a known hazard in this area and hence the timing of the passage.

We only had five days in Bali which we were determined to make the most of. The island has a very different feel and look to it, principally as it is predominantly Hindu with ornate temples and architecture. The northern side of Bali is much quieter than the south where the tourist mecca is centred – Kuta beach near Denpesar, know for its large waves and parties. Although quieter, everything is relative, the roads were very busy with motor bikes buzzing amongst the lorries and buses, often laden with an entire family, and animals – we even saw a mattress on the back of a moped. In order to have a good look around we decided to take our lives in our hands and hire a scooter for the day – in fact we borrowed one from Dalman, the boat boy who greeted us as we came into the anchorage and who arranged to fill our cans with fuel. Unlike many we at least wore helmets – Chris drove and started off quite gingerly as we wended our way through the hills behind Lovina past paddy fields, clove and cocoa plantations taking in the intoxicating smell of the spices and the incense from the temples and shrines, trying to ignore the piles of plastic rubbish. As Chris’ confidence grew we got faster and faster and by the time we got in to the town of Singaraja we were swerving in and out with the best of them – luckily we returned to Lovina unscathed.

The rally’s stop in Lovina coincided with the annual Lovina Festival with lots of competitions, local music and dancing each day. We were invited to one such event which was billed as bull racing so we all walked along to a nearby village to witness this event and quite a spectacle it turned out to be. Rather than racing for speed the bulls, elaborately adorned with bells and bright colours, were paired into yolks pulling a low cart on which the ‘driver’ balances. They would go from end to end of the the field with their tails up and heads back – prizes being awarded for the most coordinated, high stepping bulls and seemingly the exuberance of the driver. Whilst eagerly awaiting the verdict of the judges (Chris had a beer riding on the result) we were yet again entertained with balinese dancing and music.

The following day, and our last in Bali, the rally participants were invited for a day out including a visit to the Brahma Vihara Arama buddhist temple, a cocoa museum, hot springs and we were welcomed into the home of the farmer in the village of Umagero – well inland from the coast. Chris decided that he had done with being a tourist so stayed with the boat whilst Sara joined the tour. It was a great day, again having a good look at the countryside, towns and villages (this time from the more relaxed seat of a car rather than a moped). The village of Umagero had not opened its doors to visitors before and their welcome and hospitality was overwhelming – the farmer (who employs most of the villagers) and his wife opened their family home to us and the village laid on a magnificent feast including suckling pig, with lots of music, dancing and entertainment for us to watch and join in with. There were of course the inevitable speeches from the owner of the farm, the village chief, the community chief and chief of local police (at least this time they were translated for us) all welcoming us to Umagero and encouraging us and our families to return soon. Just after the lunch and entertainment were finished the heavens opened and we had a huge sustained down fall – this was the first very much needed rain for five months and all the locals were overjoyed and credited us with bringing good luck to the village. Yet again we were humbled by the heartwarming hospitality of this very proud farmer and the Balinese people.

Although we could have stayed in Bali for quite some time there is still more of this wonderful country to see, so off we set for Karimun Jawa off the coast of Java……



Komodo – Dragon land

Sailing Posted on Thu, October 08, 2015 03:34:44

The area of Komodo National Park was a very pleasant surprise for us. Although we were excited to be seeing the famous Komodo dragon we were unaware of the quality of the diving and snorkelling in the area.

Our first stop was in Waecicu Bay from where we were able to go (by boat taxi) in to Labuan Bajo for provisions. Luckily we didn’t need more than fruit and veg as the town itself was filthy, smelly and dusty – its only saving grace was a superb italian restaurant (Made in Italy) where we had dinner with Champagne Charlie and Anthem – our first truly western meal out since leaving Australia – great pizza and a decent wine list – so grown up!

We did not want to linger in Labuan Bajo so the next morning we headed out early to visit the island of Rinca to see the fearsome Komodo Dragons. We anchored in the bay near the rangers station, tied the dingy to the jetty and walked the few hundred meters along a path to the rangers station to pay our dues. Before we had gone very far we heard rustling in the undergrowth, looked up the slope beside us to see a dragon coming down to cross the path. Chris ran (very quickly) on whilst Sara tried to get a picture, but we had been warned not to get in their way as their bite is toxic enough to be fatal. They are the biggest of the world lizards, incredibly gnarly and though prefer to eat carrion, will eat anything including their young and each other. As we neared the rangers station we saw many more, but non so active. They can move very fast on land as well as being good swimmers. Most were basking in the sun or slumped in the shade. As you can see from the photos they really are the most prehistoric looking creatures – and quite a size. We went for a guided walk seeing more dragons and monkeys by which time it was getting really hot, so back to the boat to head off to find a nice peaceful anchorage for some swimming and snorkelling.

We spent five days in the Komodo area, each day anchored off a different island paddling, swimming and doing lots of snorkelling including a couple of superb drift snorkels being sluiced along the edge of the channel between the islands by the current – great fun, but you have to hold on tight to the dingy. The water clarity and condition of the coral was much better than anywhere we have seen in Indonesia so far and friends that went diving said it was the best yet – manta rays, sharks, turtles and the first big fish we’ve seen (they are protected in the national park and not fished to oblivion like elsewhere). The currents between the islands are fierce – as much as 6 knots making moving around quite a challenge but great if you get it right.

We were sad to move on from Komodo, but there are still many places to visit – next stops Lombok and Bali. As we left Gili Banta, our last anchorage, we went past Mount Sangeang, an active volcano which pushed out a puff of smoke as we sailed away.



Komodo – Dragon land

Sailing Posted on Thu, October 08, 2015 03:34:43

The area of Komodo National Park was a very pleasant surprise for us. Although we were excited to be seeing the famous Komodo dragon we were unaware of the quality of the diving and snorkelling in the area.

Our first stop was in Waecicu Bay from where we were able to go (by boat taxi) in to Labuan Bajo for provisions. Luckily we didn’t need more than fruit and veg as the town itself was filthy, smelly and dusty – its only saving grace was a superb italian restaurant (Made in Italy) where we had dinner with Champagne Charlie and Anthem – our first truly western meal out since leaving Australia – great pizza and a decent wine list – so grown up!

We did not want to linger in Labuan Bajo so the next morning we headed out early to visit the island of Rinca to see the fearsome Komodo Dragons. We anchored in the bay near the rangers station, tied the dingy to the jetty and walked the few hundred meters along a path to the rangers station to pay our dues. Before we had gone very far we heard rustling in the undergrowth, looked up the slope beside us to see a dragon coming down to cross the path. Chris ran (very quickly) on whilst Sara tried to get a picture, but we had been warned not to get in their way as their bite is toxic enough to be fatal. They are the biggest of the world lizards, incredibly gnarly and though prefer to eat carrion, will eat anything including their young and each other. As we neared the rangers station we saw many more, but non so active. They can move very fast on land as well as being good swimmers. Most were basking in the sun or slumped in the shade. As you can see from the photos they really are the most prehistoric looking creatures – and quite a size. We went for a guided walk seeing more dragons and monkeys by which time it was getting really hot, so back to the boat to head off to find a nice peaceful anchorage for some swimming and snorkelling.

We spent five days in the Komodo area, each day anchored off a different island paddling, swimming and doing lots of snorkelling including a couple of superb drift snorkels being sluiced along the edge of the channel between the islands by the current – great fun, but you have to hold on tight to the dingy. The water clarity and condition of the coral was much better than anywhere we have seen in Indonesia so far and friends that went diving said it was the best yet – manta rays, sharks, turtles and the first big fish we’ve seen (they are protected in the national park and not fished to oblivion like elsewhere). The currents between the islands are fierce – as much as 6 knots making moving around quite a challenge but great if you get it right.

We were sad to move on from Komodo, but there are still many places to visit – next stops Lombok and Bali. As we left Gili Banta, our last anchorage, we went past Mount Sangeang, an active volcano which pushed out a puff of smoke as we sailed away.



Flores..and a visit home for Sara

Sailing Posted on Thu, October 08, 2015 03:33:43

Then on to Flores from where Sara flew home for brief visit to see the family and attend Tom (nephew) and Rosie’s wedding. There was no where suitable to leave Tulu unattended so Chris stayed behind at anchor off the Sea World Resort, Maumere on the north coast of Flores.

We were towards the front of the fleet as we approached Maumere to give us time to settle into the anchorage, get Chris known in the resort so that he would be well fed in Sara’s absence and it gave us both a chance to take a day trip to see the coloured volcanic lakes of Kelimutu. The drive across the island in itself was very interesting, through villages and paddy fields, but the lakes were spectacular – three lakes of different colours, each in separate craters. The colour of each lake at any given time depends upon the volcanic activity at the time – an ever changing kaleidoscope.

Sara flew to Bali on 28th August, had a night there, and then on to London via Doha. Straight to Stamford for the bank holiday with Jonno and Bex including shopping for a wedding outfit, then back to London to apply for a new Indonesian visa (single entry only) on the Tuesday morning and then a train to Somerset after a quick coffee with New Zealand friends, David and Brenda who happen to be in town. Phew! It was lovely to see Granny and to stay at the farm. Communications from Indonesia have not been easy so I have not spoken to her as much as I would have liked, so it was particularly good to see her. The next day I drove to Penarth to see Molly (Chris’ mother) and then back via Ashcott to catch up with the Haynes and Griffs. A couple of days helping with wedding flowers and then Tom and Rosies beautiful and very emotional wedding on the Saturday followed the next day by a superb lunch party thrown by Rog (Sara’s brother) and Lou. This gave her a chance to see so many more friends than would have otherwise been possible, but best of all it was wonderful to have Jonno and Bex and Will and Charlotte all together. After the lunch party it was farewell to Mum again and back to London with Will and Charlotte, stay in their new house, seen for the first time, and then fly back to Indonesia, again to Bali and on to Flores the next day. A truly flying visit with only a week in the UK but definitely worth the hassle.

As for Chris, we thought he would be a bit lonely with Sara away, but not a bit of it. As Maumere was the stop for visa renewals he had plenty of company, particularly as in true Indonesian style this process was a bureaucratic nightmare with some people being delayed for almost a week. Chris led the charge trying to smooth the way and persuade the local authorities that this process could be a smooth one – not quite sure whether that was achieved exactly, but the rest of the fleet were grateful for his help. As a result he was bought countless happy hour beers and only ate one meal from the freezer.

As we again headed west along Flores towards Riung we made a number of night stops. You could tell we were heading into an area of Indonesia where the locals are far more used to seeing foreign boats than in the eastern islands as the villagers would paddle out from the beach in their little dug-out canoes and instead of staring and calling ‘hello mister’, the call was for ‘pen, paper, mask, ball…’. – not quite so endearing! Although we did not experience it first hand, friends told us that they were presented with magazine pictures of what they wanted!

We spent a couple of really enjoyable nights off a beautiful small island in the Riung national park – getting together for a beach BBQ with a couple of other boats – dancing in the sand was great for exfoliating the feet and a good workout. Lots of snorkelling, paddle boarding and climbing to the top of the island for the view. From there it was into Riung village and a night of the obligatory speeches from local dignitaries and then on to Labuan Bajo and the Komodo National park……



Flores..and a visit home for Sara

Sailing Posted on Thu, October 08, 2015 03:33:42

Then on to Flores from where Sara flew home for brief visit to see the family and attend Tom (nephew) and Rosie’s wedding. There was no where suitable to leave Tulu unattended so Chris stayed behind at anchor off the Sea World Resort, Maumere on the north coast of Flores.

We were towards the front of the fleet as we approached Maumere to give us time to settle into the anchorage, get Chris known in the resort so that he would be well fed in Sara’s absence and it gave us both a chance to take a day trip to see the coloured volcanic lakes of Kelimutu. The drive across the island in itself was very interesting, through villages and paddy fields, but the lakes were spectacular – three lakes of different colours, each in separate craters. The colour of each lake at any given time depends upon the volcanic activity at the time – an ever changing kaleidoscope.

Sara flew to Bali on 28th August, had a night there, and then on to London via Doha. Straight to Stamford for the bank holiday with Jonno and Bex including shopping for a wedding outfit, then back to London to apply for a new Indonesian visa (single entry only) on the Tuesday morning and then a train to Somerset after a quick coffee with New Zealand friends, David and Brenda who happen to be in town. Phew! It was lovely to see Granny and to stay at the farm. Communications from Indonesia have not been easy so I have not spoken to her as much as I would have liked, so it was particularly good to see her. The next day I drove to Penarth to see Molly (Chris’ mother) and then back via Ashcott to catch up with the Haynes and Griffs. A couple of days helping with wedding flowers and then Tom and Rosies beautiful and very emotional wedding on the Saturday followed the next day by a superb lunch party thrown by Rog (Sara’s brother) and Lou. This gave her a chance to see so many more friends than would have otherwise been possible, but best of all it was wonderful to have Jonno and Bex and Will and Charlotte all together. After the lunch party it was farewell to Mum again and back to London with Will and Charlotte, stay in their new house, seen for the first time, and then fly back to Indonesia, again to Bali and on to Flores the next day. A truly flying visit with only a week in the UK but definitely worth the hassle.

As for Chris, we thought he would be a bit lonely with Sara away, but not a bit of it. As Maumere was the stop for visa renewals he had plenty of company, particularly as in true Indonesian style this process was a bureaucratic nightmare with some people being delayed for almost a week. Chris led the charge trying to smooth the way and persuade the local authorities that this process could be a smooth one – not quite sure whether that was achieved exactly, but the rest of the fleet were grateful for his help. As a result he was bought countless happy hour beers and only ate one meal from the freezer.

As we again headed west along Flores towards Riung we made a number of night stops. You could tell we were heading into an area of Indonesia where the locals are far more used to seeing foreign boats than in the eastern islands as the villagers would paddle out from the beach in their little dug-out canoes and instead of staring and calling ‘hello mister’, the call was for ‘pen, paper, mask, ball…’. – not quite so endearing! Although we did not experience it first hand, friends told us that they were presented with magazine pictures of what they wanted!

We spent a couple of really enjoyable nights off a beautiful small island in the Riung national park – getting together for a beach BBQ with a couple of other boats – dancing in the sand was great for exfoliating the feet and a good workout. Lots of snorkelling, paddle boarding and climbing to the top of the island for the view. From there it was into Riung village and a night of the obligatory speeches from local dignitaries and then on to Labuan Bajo and the Komodo National park……



Wakatobi, Indonesia

Sailing Posted on Wed, August 26, 2015 13:00:40

Wakatobi is made up of a number of islands the main one being Wangi-Wangi where, unknown to us, several activities had been organised for the rally. After the hectic schedule in Buru, we decided that instead of heading straight to Wangi-Wangi we would spend a few days relaxing at Hoga island where there is little more than a dive resort (of sorts) lovely beaches and lots of superb snorkeling. Several other boats had the same idea so we had plenty of company. Lynne from Sunchaser and I were dropped off with our paddle boards upwind and up current of a stilt village in the Kapedulpa lagoon, across the water from our anchorage. We had a great time paddling through the stilt village, home of the Bajo people, who are a marine tribe living their very simple lives almost entirely on the water using small canoes called soppe as their means of transport. We certainly caused quite a stir as everyone came out to watch and wave – they obviously have rarely seen anything like it before!

After a few days relaxing, and Chris getting over a nasty cough and cold, we headed up to the town of Wanci on the island of Wangi Wangi for more insight into the way of life and traditions of this part of Indonesia. We arrived just after lunch and straight away Sara jumped ship to go across to a neighbouring island where we were invited to attend a Kariya ceremony. Not knowing quite what this was, she went along and was soon told that young adolescent boys and girls would be purified and paraded around the village with much ritual and celebration. All the locals were dressed up in brightly coloured traditional clothes and the youngsters who were coming of age wore elaborate headdresses and lots of makeup. We (again!) had speeches welcoming us to their Kariya festival followed by a feast with all manner of (but not particularly appetising) food. The girls were presented to one of the village elders who daubed their feet and ankles with ginger dipped in a white powder with lots of whooping and shouting and dancing from their mothers. Then the girls were hoisted at shoulder height on bamboo litters and paraded around the village with the boys leading and the rest of the village (including us) following. The boys and girls seemed to be rather quiet and anxious and we initially assumed that their headdresses were getting very heavy – but with the help of local guides who have reasonable english we realised that this ritual was the lead up to them all being circumcised – both boys and girls – a ritual I thought had been outlawed, but clearly not in this moslem area of Indonesia. I would have liked to have probed further, but with limited language and not wanting to convey my feelings on the practice it was difficult – let’s put it this way – it is their custom and the families were celebrating so we were not in a position to judge, but felt privileged to be invited to share in their festival whether we approved or not. However, it did prey on my mind afterwards.

The next day was far more light-hearted. We were taken to the village of Waehumu where, after the obligatory speeches, prayers and feasting, we watched the game of Separaga a game similar to volleyball but played with the feet and a rattan ball. The referee was hilarious – one of the elders dressed in full ceremonial robes carrying a handbag – see his photo in the gallery. Following that we were invited to join in various other traditional games using large fruit seeds and coconut shells – much to the amusement of the local villagers. Again Wakatobi, like its neighbours, looked after us very generously and took us to see the local forts, beaches and they even showed us their new airport terminal building of which they are obviously very proud.



South Buru, Indonesia

Sailing Posted on Fri, August 21, 2015 05:13:03

It is rather disconcerting when you read on the chart “Caution – An area prohibited to foreign vessels surrounding Buru extends about 10 miles from the coast”. The Sail2Indonesia rally have been invited by the Regency of South Buru to visit their island – the first foreign sailing boats to be allowed such an honour in recent times. The doors have been previously closed as Buru was a place of exile for people of the communist party. We anchored off Namrole, the main town, early in the morning on our 31st wedding anniversary. We were given a wonderful welcome with lots of curious locals calling “halo mister” – again, we were as interesting to them as they are to us. A group of ‘guides’ who have a little english were tasked to look after us and were incredibly helpful – Sara went into the village one afternoon to try to buy some bananas and before long she was on the back of a moped (only the driver had a helmet) being whisked off to a market having been told how much to pay. Adventurous or stupid – who knows but she survived and returned with bananas galore.

The organised programme of events in Buru was very interesting but exhausting – lots of speeches and dances and every village wanted a piece of the action. One day we visited four villages! At each we were met by the village elders, addressed in their local dialect and dances were performed before the constant request for photos. We were amazed by the number and quality of cameras and I-phones the local villagers have. Although, after 3 days, this got a little wearing we had some wonderful experiences – crossing rivers by duen (bamboo rafts) to get to Waenalut village, swimming in a sacred waterhole, being invited to look in the houses of the Rumah Tiga people, eating local food prepared by the ladies of the villages all laid out on the beach (palm fronds make excellent buffet tables) and exploring the mountainous, densely vegetated island. We visitors piled into rather hot minibuses with plastic seats while the Indonesian dignitaries that accompanied us were in smart SUV’s. To get back from one particular village that we had to hike to we took a local boat ride home – quite an experience – very hairy – wet and fast and fun.

The final closing ceremony and dinner was hosted by the Regent (top man) of South Buru – lots more speeches (in Bahasa) and dances, but the biggest surprise of the night was when the Regent, who did not seem to have a word of english, got up and blasted out an amazingly good rendition of ‘My Way’ – eat your heart out Frank!

The people of Buru are desperate to tempt tourists to their shores and it is a beautiful island with great potential, but a lot of infrastructure is needed before it can really appear on the tourist map. Along with many of the remoter Indonesian islands they have a lot to offer but need not necessarily frequent, but reliable transport on and off island and places for people to stay comfortably. On Tulu we have the best of both – a warm friendly welcome but a comfy refuge at the end of the day. Next, they need to sort out the bureaucracy and ever changing inconsistent immigration and customs rules – good luck with that!

After frantic Buru we set sail overnight for the hopefully rather more relaxing Wakatobi…….



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